Finding a candidate to interview can be difficult. Many times people are simply not qualified for the positions that they apply for. But there are other times when a candidate is qualified, but our failure to realize that we are stereotyping them stops us from even considering them. You may not even pay attention to the fact that you are being discriminating to some of your applicants, especially if this is something that you have been doing for quite some time. Here are few signs that you may be stereotyping some qualified candidates, and decreasing your chances of finding the best person for the job.

What’s In a Name?

Look Beyond What Is The Application Or Resume Says

Look Beyond What Is The Application Or Resume Says

When you’re looking through applications, what do you think about when you’re seeing people’s names? The answer should be, “nothing.” A name shouldn’t be an important factor when considering candidates. However, many of us automatically toss applications and resumes when they list unusual names. If the name isn’t common, one that is difficult to spell, or one that is foreign and hard to pronounce, some of us may not even consider speaking with the applicant because we automatically assume that they aren’t going to “fit in” with the company. This is an awful thing to do, and each time we do it, we’re lowering our chances of bringing diversity into the company.

Not a Real Education

Avoid Stereotyping Your Potential Candidates

Avoid Stereotyping Your Potential Candidates

Another thing many of us do when we’re reading applications and resumes is deciding that certain education isn’t “good enough” for the company. Some applicants graduate from colleges and universities that we don’t consider to be “real schools” even if they obtained a degree for all of their hard work. While it is important to make sure that applicants have the required degrees, deciding whether or not their degree is worthy shouldn’t be a choice that we make just from reading it on a resume.

It is definitely possible that some of these applicants didn’t take their studies seriously, but it’s also possible that some applicants worked extremely hard and went above and beyond what was necessary for each assignment. The only way you can find out which of these candidates is which is if you communicate with them. Don’t let what you assume cause you to toss a perfectly good resume and/or application into the trashcan.

Stereotyping candidates shows a lot about your character, and if you happen to do it when other people are around, it can lead them to believe that you are a prestigious or racist person. If you want to avoid this, don’t dwell on what a candidate’s name is, or what school they graduates from. As long as they meet the qualifications of the company, give everyone an equal chance. Doing so will allow you the opportunity to interview with more candidates, and will greate the chance of finding someone who is perfect for your vacant position. If you don’t think you can get over stereotyping candidates, it may be time to allow someone else to do the hiring.